Historical Artifacts From Quarantine

I’ve been wondering what artifacts will tell the story of this historical moment. Elaine Welteroth’s wedding belongs in textbooks. I mean where does one begin? The mask, the limited amount of guest (15 person cap) for an established NYT bestselling author and former editor-in-chief of American Teen Vogue, hardly anybody touching one another for safety reasons. This picture is epic. I truly wish Picasso could rise from the grave and give us a collection. The Corona Period, Quarantine Period, Blue Period Two, Covid Period. What do you think he would name it? Which artist would you bring back to document this moment in time? Via: The Root

Medication For The Insecure

The man who treated me badly,
who strung me along,
and who couldn’t make up his mind was lost
somewhere between his parents house and
my apartment that Thanksgiving night.

What is far more likely to happen in most cases
is that as long as you allow someone to treat you badly,
they will continue to do so.
If you’re not able to value yourself, no one else will either.

Artist: Flow Market Official

Forever Hold Your Peace

It’s so hard giving a book review without spoiling it. This book was seriously f*cked up. So this famous artist is accused of killing her husband and placed in a mental facility, where she doesn’t speak a word for seven years. She also stops painting. Theo, determined to get her to speak, joins the psychiatric team. Others have tried and failed at getting her to talk, but he is convinced he can do it.

The director of the ward allows him to try unconventional tactics to do so. In a desperate attempt to prevent the facility from being shut down. Theo has been warned not to fall in love with the artist, as she has a way with men. A femme fatale if you will.

This book is actually funny in a dark way. It’s filled with twist and turns, as the reader tries to determine who really committed the murder. Dude, it does not end the way one would expect. Truly a brilliant piece of work. Photo: A Girl On An Adventure

There, There

This is super apt since Columbus Day just passed. There, There is author Tommy Orange’s literary debut. It tells the story of the Native American diaspora, the consequence of a genocide that America masks and glorifies. Through various perspectives, the reader is able to see the cause and effect the massacre of these people have had generationally.

Imagine trying to put together the pieces of broken glass. Gathering up all the pieces is nearly impossible, even if you did what tools could you use to put it all back together? How do you do it without getting shards underneath your skin, without bleeding? This is the struggle of the contemporary Native Americans, trying to rebuild what was dismantled and destroyed.

Beyond history class, Columbus Day and Thanksgiving, where are the voices of the Native American people? This book is gritty, thought provoking, heart rending and necessary. These voices need to be heard. Their stories are integral to the history of the American people.