De-Conditioning: I Am Not Your Mammy

Nor your punching bag. Many people treat black women as such, the theme of 2020 is pointing it out. It’s either entitled males who believe subconsciously, or consciously that I am property, so they can meddle in my life.

It’s been women, particularly white women, believing I am lesser; that I deserved to be bullied, or told to move on.

Then there are the women of color, who see themselves this way and think I should be equally enslaved, because they weren’t outliers of systemic racism through their environment.

Take a real good look at these photos, then a look at yourself. I am not your mammy, or the help, they didn’t deserve to be either. And yet still you take from us, trying to make us masculine when our aesthetic is the standard of beauty that’s been appropriated. Check yourself, before I check you, because I will gladly do it in honor of my ancestors. How often do you think from a black woman’s point of view? Do you disrespect black women, because you want to feel better than someone else based on social constructs? Are you a self loathing black person?Via: Girl Gone Golden

Don’t Invalidate Feelings: https://sainttwenty.com/2020/06/04/de-conditioning-dont-invalidate-feelings/

B.A.PS

Preach Whitley.

Nothing will ever stop me,

from loving being a black woman.

Even at our caricatured worst,

we still move the culture.

That part though.

How has a black woman uplifted your life? Via: The Village Wrds

Bad Bitch, Beaches, Birthdays

Me walking into the next beach day, knowing black don’t crack and I’m going to be a bikini clad bad bitch for the longest. Favorite Halle Berry film? Via: Halle Berry Fan Pics

Praying For A Heatwave

Me next week now that I’m feeling better.
Can’t wait to get darker.

Artist: Aaronya Paints

Happy Birthday To A President And A Princess

Two of the sexiest world leaders to ever exist. Their birthday should be a holiday just for their iconic level of existence. Thank you for both for being born. We are eternally grateful. Should today be a holiday? Via: Royal Watcher

The Size Of Grapefruit By Eva Woolridge

“A visual narrative based on Eva’s traumatic medical event which highlights the emotional stages from before, during and after her surgery. Her objective is to address the lack of information and medical attentiveness available for Black women regarding their reproductive health. Eva’s story addresses symptoms of ovarian cysts and the micro aggressions Black women face during times of crisis…” –Leica Camera

Black women have higher death rates under medical care, especially noted during labor. Why? We are perceived as being able to tolerate more pain, ignored when agony is vocalized. Whereas our white counterparts are over medicated.